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5 Failproof Studio Apartment Layout

Arranging your furniture is difficult enough when it isn’t all crammed into a single room. But here you are, in your tiny one-room apartment, kindly referred to as a “studio,” and all that stuff has to go somewhere. Don’t lose heart! And learn from these real-life studio apartment layout designed by real-life studio apartment dwellers like you.

Create Separate Areas with a Storage Piece

A side floating shelves next to the bed creates a bit of separation between the living and sleeping areas while also providing extra storage in a 204-square-foot apartment. Try to put choose a single comfy chair instead of a couch, which is ideal for a one-person apartment.

Separate your two main pieces

Putting the sofa and bed against opposite walls, or place a multipurpose divider like TV cabinet. This helps to define the two spaces and eliminates the hotel-room feeling of sitting on a sofa right next to the head of your bed. It also leaves room at the foot of the bed for a small work area.

Create Your Own “Private” Sleeping Area

If you have a studio apartment but are tired of staring at your bed all day, take a cue from deRaismes’ 312 square foot DC studio. On one side of the room, a bookcase serves as a legitimate bedroom, complete with a room divider. The transition between the living room and the kitchen is defined by a sofa with a console table behind it. It’s a great idea for a small space because the console can also serve as extra kitchen storage and countertop space when needed.

Choose a Sleeping Spot

Create a cozy bedroom nook in a 490 square foot apartment by positioning the bed in a corner and placing a bookcase at the foot of the bed. This leaves plenty of room for her living/dining area, which is actually quite large — proof that it is possible to have it all in one room.

Limited color scheme

What is the relationship between color scheme and layout? It is more important than you may believe. Overly complicated schemes have a tendency to make small apartments feel choppy or too busy. Instead of focusing on just one color, choose two or three and incorporate them throughout the entire apartment. This helps to tie your entire studio together in a way that the eye can easily process. It also makes the overall design feel more cohesive. As always, the 60-30-10 color rule should be followed. When working with such small square footage, we recommend that your dominant shade (60%) be a neutral color to open up the space as much as possible. Then, for your secondary color, choose a mid-tone (30%), and for your accent color, use pops of something bolder (10%).

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